Conflict Diamonds

Is the Diamond Industry Close to Eliminating Conflict Diamonds?

Is the Diamond Industry Close to Eliminating Conflict Diamonds?

Conflict diamonds have been plaguing diamond producers and end-consumers for decades. Conflict diamonds refer to diamonds mined in a war zone and traded to finance invading armies, an insurgency or a warlord’s activity. They are most commonly mined and traded in Africa, principally in Angola, Ivory Coast and Sierra Leone. Now, according to Rough & Polished, a scientific solution could identify and eradicate blood diamonds within “a matter of years”.

Polished Diamonds (Source: Grafvision / Fotolia)

Polished Diamonds (Source: Grafvision / Fotolia)

Andrey Polyakov, the President of the World Diamond Council (WDC), recently said that “technology could change the way rough diamonds are traced to their origins”, thus aiding the Kimberley Process’ certification scheme in its prevent conflict diamonds from entering the diamond supply chain. Polyakov said that “while about 99.8% of the world’s rough diamonds were certified by the Kimberley Process’ certification scheme, it was small artisanal miners, mostly in Africa, that presented the final challenge”.

According to Rough & Polished, the Kimberley Process was set up under a United Nations resolution in 2000 “as a system to try and stem the trade of conflict diamonds, which it defines as stones that are sold to finance a rebel movement seeking to overthrow a legitimate government”.

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